Mark White Production Design

 

 

 

 

 by Kirk Honeycutt  “PLEASE GIVE” Review, January 23, 2010

"The self-enclosed world of these New Yorkers is very well observed as designer Mark White has made the apartments, streets and businesses all seem to belong to the same small village."

 

 by Justin Chang  “PLEASE GIVE” Review

"Production and set design not only offer a wealth of trendy retro furnishings but demonstrate meticulous attention to specifics of class and character."

 

 by Justin Chang “Winter’s Bone” Review

“The world Granik, lenser Michael McDonough and production designer Mark White have captured -- an open junkyard where trailers and cottages are all but indistinguishable from the surrounding scrap heaps -- conveys such a bone-deep sense of place, it's hard not to imagine (even hope) that it harbors yet more evil secrets waiting to be discovered.”

 

by David D'Arcy  Winter’s Bone Review

“Winter’s Bone features painfully realistic interiors by production designer Mark White and set decorator Rebecca Brown, all looking as if they have been recorded by investigators documenting rural poverty. The camera lingers long enough so the audience doesn’t miss any details.”

 

 by Eddie Cockrell “Transamerica” Review

“Discreetly strong tech contributions are led by Mark White’s spot-on production design, which conveys the cluttered conservative charm of mid-America on a series of locations in New York State and Arizona.”

 

by Richard Propes "Winter's Bone Review

"Mark White's production design is as important to Winter's Bone as the words, the characters and the story itself. They all, out of necessity, intertwine and complement each other."

 

by Sheri Linden “Transamerica’ Review

“Their journey takes them to the Phoenix McMansion of Bree's family -- whose kitsch collectibles, part of Mark White's excellent production design, supply one of the funniest moments in the film.”

 

by Sheila Roberts “TRANSAMERICA” Review

“The production design by Mark White, particularly at Bree’s parent’s home, stands out so that we perceive immediately why Bree is filled with so much self-doubt.”

 

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by David Parkinson "Winter's Bone"  Review

"Mark White’s meticulous production design, which barely distinguishes between the dwellings occupied by the feuding families and the ramshackle outhouses surrounded by rusting junk. but this is far from being another clichéd backwoods melodrama, as the dealings are largely conducted by the womenfolk, who never seem to use more words than are strictly necessary."

"PLEASE GIVE" essay and interview

In "Winter's Bone," meanwhile, the small house, crammed with the accumulated stuff of generations, where Jennifer Lawrence's 17-year-old character Ree Dolly is raising her younger siblings exerts a pull that is sometimes a little tough to understand – at least in architectural rather than familial or financial terms. Even Mark White's remarkable production design isn't quite enough to explain it. Still, in a movie about authenticity, the house is a starkly effective symbol of a connection to place so fundamental it is essentially tribal.

By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic

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The 14 beautiful homes of The Astronaut Wives Club

Production Designer Mark White takes us inside and behind the scenes — 33 photos